What I’ve Learned from Loving a Person with Scoliosis

For anyone who knows suomeone with scoliosis

The Curvy Spine

I asked my closest family and friends to share what they’ve learned from loving a person with scoliosis, and this is what they had to say:

I’ve learned a lot about resilience, and about individual strength to cope with and push through challenges. But I’ve also learned about helplessness, and understanding that as people we have an incredible capacity in some ways, but we are so restricted in others. — said my doting husband

I suffered a lot with everything you went through,and through your resilience and resignation, little by little, I learned to accept that in life we have to accept everything that is presented to us. I also learned that even through all the pain, you can move forward in life. You are a very strong person and I know that you provide an example to many people. — said my concerned mama

For me it was that…

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Ghosts Of Diets Past, Present and Future

I have said this for years!

Confronting The Confusing World Of Nutrition

It always makes me laugh whenever someone refers to eating a low-carb diet as a “fad”. Be it LCHF, Ketogenic, Paleo, Banting, Atkins or whatever trendy name you want to call it, human beings have been nourishing their bodies with animal fats/proteins and vegetables since the beginning of their existence. Over the vast scope of time, humans in general, have always been carnivores/omnivores, feasting on hunted meats, gathered vegetables and the occasional seasonal fruit.


In fact, if one were to measure human history by the scale of a 24-hour clock:

  • Refined carbohydrates were introduced to our diet a mere 5 seconds ago.
  • The dietary advice to eat low-fat for optimal health, only 2 seconds ago.

Perhaps these short sighted individuals should reexamine the definition of the word “fad”

What has happened since we have adopted this new “low-fat fad”? A global insurgence of metabolic disease, all in different stages…

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What I Mean When I Say I Have Scoliosis

The Curvy Spine

Scoliosis is an extremely complicated condition. According to WebMD, “scoliosis is a lateral (toward the side) curvature in the normally straight vertical line of the spine.” But that’s the super basic, elementary explanation for a very complex condition that affects the body, mind and soul. Scoliosis can cause a ginormous list of physical symptoms that lead to mental and emotional distress. Although those who live with scoliosis are similar in some ways, no two people are really 100% alike in their symptoms and in the consequences they face due to scoliosis. In my time writing my story on The Curvy Spine, I’ve had several people ask what scoliosis feels like. Here’s my brief explanation of what it’s like for me to live with scoliosis:

Those Nights When I Need Help
There are nights when I am in so much pain that I lack the stamina and the strength to adjust…

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The Core Workout I Do for My Scoliosis

These look very good for anyone with scoliosis (or even those without).

The Curvy Spine

So the truth is, I am not a big fan of taking pictures of myself working out and then publishing them, but I did it anyway. I did it because one of you, my dear followers, asked me to share the workout that I do on a daily basis to help with flexibility, strength and pain. I am not going to pretend I have a bikini-ready body, because I definitely do not. Merely, I want to share with all of you my workout routine and I hope it helps someone along the way.

As a side note, I am not a personal trainer, and I have no degree in fitness whatsoever, so please talk to your doctor or someone who knows your body well before you try my routine yourself.

Click here to download the image.

core-workouts-for-scoliosis-1


The Curvy Spine does not generate any income, but if you feel inspired, buy…

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13 Things No One Told Me About Having Scoliosis Surgery

One young lady’s experience of scoliosis surgery

The Curvy Spine

Seventeen years ago, I found myself dealing with idiopathic scoliosis and two major spinal curves: one was 74 degrees and the other was 55 degrees. It was the severity of my condition, and the fact that I really had no other option, that pushed me to undergo surgery. For so many reasons, having surgery was the best thing I could have done, but even still, there are a few things no one told me.

Here’s my list:

1. When the morphine began to fade, I freaked out.
By the time I had surgery, I had dealt with spinal pain for a good three years; I was convinced I could handle any pain. I thought I could deal with anything. Boy, was I wrong. It hurts. It hurts like a sonofabitch. The level of pain is astronomical. As soon as my magical morphine button was taken away from me the devil…

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Picture of hypermobile thumb

The Problem with Dancers

So what is the problem with dancers? First of all, I have nothing against dancers at all.Have a look at this: Sergei Polunin dancing to Hosier’s Take Me To Church – who could object to this! 😉

But as an osteopath, I do find that as far as their musculoskeletal system goes, they can be a problem. This is because many of them are hypermobile.

So what is ‘hypermobility’?’ It is defined as the ability to move joints beyond the normal range of movement. (Some people know it as being ‘double-jointed’). But that is good, isn’t it? I hear you say. Well, it can be good for a dancer, of course, but it can be a double edged sword. Here’s why:

If you are hypermobile (and many children are, but some don’t grow out of it) it can lead to all sorts of problems in later life, as I know to my cost. Because, although I am definitely not a dancer, I was hypermobile when I was younger.You may even have Joint Hypermobilty Syndrome.

So how do you know if you are hypermobile? There are various signs that could indicate that you are hypermobile. Firstly children, hypermobile people are usually either very flexible and can impress their friends with their contortions, gymnastics or ‘double-jointedness’ or they are very clumsy (I was the latter!) The clumsiness is because their joint position sense is often slightly ‘off’ (That’s my excuse and I’m sticking to it!)

Picture of hypermobile thumb

Other signs are:

Recurrent dislocations

Prolapses common because of weak pelvic and/or abdominal muscles (e.g. hiatus hernia)

Overreaction to exercise (you feel VERY achey – I used to think I’d simply done a good workout)

Stretch marks common at a young age

Easily bruised

The skin often feels soft and velvety;

Unexplained chest pains  (may have been told they have a heart murmur)

Low blood pressure or fast heart rate, which may lead to blackouts or near blackouts and often triggered by change in posture from lying/sitting to standing, or after standing in one position for even just a few minutes;

Symptoms like Irritable Bowel Syndrome with bloating, constipation, and cramp-like abdominal pain

Shortness of breath similar to asthma, but doesn’t respond to inhalers

Local anaesthetics, used for example in dentistry, seem to be not very effective or much more is required than normal

Severe fatigue

Anxiety and phobias

However, this doesn’t necessarily mean you have Joint Hypermobility Syndrome. Here is a link to some information from the Hypermobility Syndromes Association

 

 

Image credit: By Magnolia Dysnomia (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

 

Richard III’s back!

A blog I wrote for a Richard III blog

murreyandblue

Despite clear explanations by a spinal expert, the exact nature of Richard III’s spinal curvature is still being misconstrued and misunderstood. As an osteopath, I feel I am in a position to shed some definitive light on it.

Richard was portrayed by Shakespeare as a hunchback (“Bunch-backed toad”), with a withered arm and a limp.

The detailed examination of his spine by the experts has proved that he did not have a withered arm, and there was no evidence of a limp, either. If you think the bones are unlikely to show whether or not he had a withered arm you would be wrong, because the pull of muscles on the skeleton actually causes changes in the bone. That is why new born babies have no mastoid process (the bony part of the skull behind the ear) – it only develops after the baby is able to hold up its…

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Latest DNA Evidence

This says it very clearly!

murreyandblue

Contrary to the impression given by certain articles, the latest DNA evidence does not repeat not demonstrate that there was illegitimacy in the line of descent from Edward III to Richard III. It demonstrates it either there or in the line from Edward III to the present Duke of Beaufort. (The latter line, being longer, is statistically more probable, but that’s as much as we can say.)

In addition the present queen is not impacted in any way, as she is sovereign by statute. Specifically the Act of Settlement of 1701, which gives the throne to descendants of Sophia, Electress of Hanover. Her descent from Sophia is not involved in the DNA ‘chain’ in question.

Any information to the contrary is ‘spherical objects’.

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