Photo of teenager texting

Text Neck – Have you got a boxer dog on your head?

Text Neck is exactly what it says it is!  Pain caused by texting.  It can also be caused by balancing a boxer dog on your head.  Allow me to explain.

Text Neck is an injury to the neck caused by hanging your head forward, looking down at your mobile devices too frequently for extended periods of time.

Statistics say that 37-million people in the UK spend a minimum of 4 hours a day on their mobile devices.  Four hours!  Yes, those quick checks of emails and Facebook, or that sneaky game in your coffee break, all add up.

And the weight the neck has to carry dramatically adds up when it is flexed forward. The more you crane your neck, the heavier load it carries.  Your body will then have to work harder to support this extra weight, which can lead to soreness in the neck, stiffness across the shoulders, headaches, and pain in the upper back.

You won’t believe the maths of text neck

Photo of teenager texting

The average adult head weighs about 10-12lbs (4-5kg). But when you tip your head forwards just 1 inch you add an extra 10lbs force through your neck vertebrae.  That’s 4kg for every 2.5cms.

So…

  • 15 degrees flexion puts the equivalent of 27 lbs weight through your neck.
  • At 30 degrees it’s about 40 lbs.
  • At 45 degrees you have about 49 lbs extra force on those poor vertebrae.
  • And at 60 degrees (the normal position for texting) it’s about 60 lbs.

A boxer dog!

60 lbs extra weight!  How heavy is that?  Here are some equivalents that you could balance on your head to get the same weight:

  • 6 fat cats
  • A boxer dog
  • 4 average bowling balls
  • 9 ½ bricks
  • 45 basket balls
  • 65 footballs
  • 100 hamsters

What really concerns me is that about 50% of the people adopting this forward bent posture are children and teenagers.

Can it be prevented?

The key is to significantly reduce the amount of time spent looking down.  Of course the ideal thing would be to take frequent breaks from your mobile phone and computer.  But life isn’t always ideal so even if you can’t take breaks from your phone try holding it slightly higher, at eye level, to relieve the stress on those poor muscles.

And don’t put a boxer dog or 100 hamsters on your head either!

 

 

 

Image credit: By DLSimaging (Tiffany, Texting Uploaded by JohnnyMrNinja) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

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Do you have ‘Computer Hump’?

Do you find you sit at your computer for hours at a time?
Does your job involve lots of data entry, typing or other computer activities?
Do you play games on your PC/laptop?
ARE YOU EXPERIENCING ACHING BACK AND SHOULDERS?!
If you answered “Yes” to any of these question, you could have “computer hump”!
What is “computer hump”? (No, not THAT kind of hump!)
 
Computer hump is a painful condition that develops when someone has been sitting for long periods of time in front of the computer and is caused by the joints and muscles stiffening up through being in one position for too long.
This is especially the case if you sit incorrectly, slumped or with your head and neck bent forwards.  You can develop a small “hump” at the top of your back, below your neck, also known as a Dowager’s hump.

What can you do about it?
 
Well, first of all – stop spending so long on the computer. Set a timer for half an hour so you remember to stop, get up and have a stretch after this amount of time. 
 
If at work, at least get up and stretch, visit the loo, have a tea break, etc.
Do shoulder shrugs rotating backward and forward to help loosen up the joints.
 
Make sure you have a support for your lumbar spine (low back).  This will encourage you to have better posture.
If you have any aching or pains, go and see your osteopath who will treat the problem and give you exercises or advice to help prevent it recurring.
 

Remember, the sooner you seek advice about a problem the quicker it will resolve.